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NetBSD livecd jibbed updated, 2009-03-24 00:00:00 #
Jibbed The NetBSD livecd has been updated to a new version.

tags: NetBSD



NetBSD wishlist item - secmodelctl and kauth system call scope, 2009-03-20 00:00:00 #
Okay, so came through the mailing lists recently about systrace being removed and how to handle it. This got me thinking about and . Two ideas came to mind: 1) Implement system calls as a kauth scope. 2) Create a tool called secmodelctl which allowed for manipulation on an level of the security model. The main use for systrace to come back, in my opinion, is for great projects like . secmodelctl should be like pfctl where you can load a config file, manipulate rules, etc.

tags: NetBSD



Bruteforce TrueCrypt - some hints, 2009-03-16 00:00:00 #
So someone I know recently forgot their password to a TrueCrypt volume and asked me to try getting into it. Obviously, I'm not much of a hacker but I wrote a little perl script to attempt a bunch of password iterations thought I would share some parts. The main thing to share is the list of arguments: Then the more dynamic parts (obviously, pass needs to come from some kind of password dictionary or password-generating subroutine). @prog is the loop-local copy of @tc_opt. Then the last bit: $? will be true on failure and false on success (1 vs 0) or you can get fancy and also test for negative values. I was unable to recover the password because I didn't have enough information and I can only test one password/few seconds on my poor, slow computer, so a massive dictionary attack is out of the question, but if you're in the same boat this should get you started on the recovery.

tags: perl,programming



NetBSD powerd wish-list item, 2009-03-14 00:00:00 #
We had an interesting discussion on EFNet/#netbsd this morning about some possible enhancements to acpi and some other facilities being improved/introduced in NetBSD 5. The main idea was this: given a set of criteria, could netbsd automatically turn off hardware components to save on power? So, for a simple example, if I have a server with two cpu's and my system load is less than 1 for an extended period of time, why not step down my cpu speed and if my load continues to stay low, turn off one cpu? What if I never use more than half of my ram? Or what if my network traffic could go from gig to 100M without any harm? I've worked in some power and cooling-starved datacenters where we would never seriously consider trying to set all of this stuff up, while at the same time we had a lot of standby servers, or very idle systems. This tells me that power management is probably seen as risky, difficult, or both. All of this stuff, of course, also applies to laptops which need extended battery performance, lid-closing sleeps, etc. It's one of the few places where laptop-driven technology could make a big impact in a datacenter. Anyway, netbsd isn't really there yet to provide a lot of this, but it seems to have facilities which could be put together to almost solve the problem: And maybe something more like sar or a similar dtrace-type listener.

tags: NetBSD



mk-configure - NetBSD's make to replace autoconf, 2009-03-10 00:00:00 #
I wanted to give a little press to by Aleksey Cheusov because I think it's an interesting project and because the auto tools are a regular source of heartache for developers and users. (you might know them as the standard ./configure && make && make install cycle) Having a BSD-based alternative to these tools is nice for someone making BSD software and pushing the use of NetBSD's flavor of make is also cool because it's very powerful and could do a lot of things (like the above project shows) that are currently achieved with many different and difficult to understand/learn tools. Make is magic-enough. :)

tags: NetBSD



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